Shocking Moment High Winds From Storm Jorge Blow Over Truck

This video shows the dramatic moment high winds from Storm Jorge caused a lorry in County Galway to blow over: The footage was captured on the N59 at Maam Cross in Connemara, according to the Irish Mirror, and fortunately the driver of the truck wasn’t injured. As a result of the video, motorists are being warned to be careful on the roads as Storm Jorge begins to batter the west coast of Ireland.

Gardai are at the scene of an overturned truck in the Maam Cross area of Galway.

Luckily the driver of the truck sustained no injuries. An Garda Siochana are advising that people adhere to the weather warnings in place and ask that people do not make unnecessary journeys.

pic.twitter.com/zKUDrrnPHj
– An Garda Siochana (@GardaTraffic) February 29, 2020

The Met Office has issued a yellow warning for Northern Ireland, meaning that gusts inland of 50-60mph (80-100km/h) are expected with stronger gales up to 70mph (115km/h) in exposed coastal areas. According to RTE, winds were at speeds in excess of 80mph (130 km/h) on the west coast at the peak of the storm, early in the afternoon during the Status Red warning which lasted from 11am to 3pm in counties Clare and Galway.

A Status Orange warning remains in place in Clare, Galway, Sligo, Mayo, Leitrim, and Donegal until midnight, with other areas subject to yellow warnings until 10pm.

:warning: Yellow wind warning’s updated :warning: Valid until 9am Sunday across much of England and Wales Valid until 3pm Sunday across Northern Ireland, southern Scotland and northern England

Wind gusts 50-60mph, but 70mph around coasts and hills Stay

#Weatheraware #StormJorge pic.twitter.com/C798VQqZNP
– Met Office (@metoffice) February 29, 2020

When it comes to the UK, it was predicted that the majority of the UK will be affected, with yellow weather warnings for rain remaining in place. On Sunday 1 March, the rain is expected to subside, with the Met Office’s chief meteorologist Paul Gundersen saying: “This weekend we’ll see another named storm bring strong winds to parts of the UK with several wind and rain warnings in place.”

If you were wondering why the storm is named Jorge and not Ellen, the Met Office has explained: “Spanish meteorological service, part of the south west Europe storm naming group, named Storm Jorge on Thursday (27th). “It is convention for all other national meteorological services to then use that name when referring to the low pressure. As such the system will not be named Ellen but will align with our European partners and be referred to as ‘Jorge’.

“The fact that the system may have a different name than some expected should not influence their response.”