Norfolk

Biker killed in crash with reversing lorry, court hears

The inquest of a motorcyclist who died after a collision with a lorry on Mill Road, in Burston, is due to be opened on Monday. Picture: Google Street View

The inquest of a motorcyclist who died after a collision with a lorry on Mill Road, in Burston, is due to be opened on Monday. Picture: Google Street View

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An inquest has been opened and adjourned into the death of a motorcyclist who died on a narrow Norfolk lane while a lorry was reversing.

Clive Cattermole died in a crash at Mill Road, Burston, near Diss on September 7.

Police and paramedics rushed to the scene at 7.44am but he was pronounced dead just over half an hour later.

An inquest into his death was opened on Monday (September 21) and heard that he was a fabricator who lived in Mill Green in the village.

The hearing, held over video platform Teams, heard that Mr Cattermole and the lorry were both travelling in the same direction but that the HGV was reversing having met an oncoming HGV in the narrow country lane.

The 64-year-old’s cause of death was given as extensive injuries to the chest as a result of a road traffic accident.

Assistant coroner Catherine Wood adjourned the hearing until March 8, 2021, when a full inquest will be heard.


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7 things to do in Norfolk this weekend: September 12 to 13

The Nearly Festival Garden Party, which has been adapted for social distancing, is one of the events taking place this weekend in Norfolk, this picture is from the 2019 event in Oulton Broad. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

The Nearly Festival Garden Party, which has been adapted for social distancing, is one of the events taking place this weekend in Norfolk, this picture is from the 2019 event in Oulton Broad. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

From socially-distanced music festivals to a free market, there is plenty to keep you entertained in Norfolk this weekend.

Wild Fields Festival is heading to the Norfolk Showground and is a two-day socially-distanced event Picture: Supplied by Wild FieldsWild Fields Festival is heading to the Norfolk Showground and is a two-day socially-distanced event Picture: Supplied by Wild Fields

1. What: Wild Fields Festival

Where: Norfolk Showground, Dereham Road, New Costessey, NR5 0TT

When: September 12 to 13, 12pm to 11pm

Cost: Day tickets from £30, weekend tickets from £45 (both + booking fee), wildpaths.co.uk/wildfields

Wild Paths Festival launched last October with over 200 acts performing at 23 venues over four days, celebrating both local and international talent. The event was cancelled this year due to coronavirus, but organiser Ben Street is making sure music fans don’t miss out with a new socially-distanced version of the festival called Wild Fields. The biggest names on the line-up are KOKOROKO, Gengahr, Joe Armon-Jones, Another Sky and Olivia Dean and to keep audiences safe, there will be roped off zones spaced two metres apart for groups of up to six and marshalled queues for the food stalls, bars and toilets.

Dragon Hall in Norwich is one of the venues taking part in Norfolk Heritage Open Days Picture: DENISE BRADLEYDragon Hall in Norwich is one of the venues taking part in Norfolk Heritage Open Days Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

2. What: Heritage Open Days

Where: Various locations across Norfolk

When: September 11 to 20

Cost: All free, see the full programme at norfolkheritageopendays.co.uk

Explore Norfolk’s hidden gems for free as the Heritage Open Days festival, a nationwide celebration of history and culture, returns for 2020. Due to coronavirus and social distancing restrictions, the festival includes online activities to accompany traditional in-person events for the first time. Highlights include a heritage photo walk at the Former RAF Coltishall, the chance to explore Bishop’s House Garden in Norwich and botanical drawing for beginners in Thetford.

Interlude Fringe is part of Interlude, which is running for six weeks in Chapelfield Gardens and has been organised by Norwich Theatre and circus company Lost in Translation Picture: James RandleInterlude Fringe is part of Interlude, which is running for six weeks in Chapelfield Gardens and has been organised by Norwich Theatre and circus company Lost in Translation Picture: James Randle

3. What: Interlude Fringe

Where: Chapelfield Gardens, Norwich, NR2 1RP

When: September 13, 10am to 6pm

Cost: £15 for the day, 01603 630000, norwichtheatre.org

This event is a collaboration between Norwich Theatre and Norwich Fringe and it is part of Interlude, a six-week programme of live shows in a big top tent. Local acts will come together for a day of live music, comedy and theatre and all ticket sales will go directly to the artists performing, thanks to generous donations made as part of Norwich Theatre’s Crisis Appeal. See the full line-up for the day and timings on the Norwich Theatre website.

The Nearly Festival Garden Party is one of the events you can attend this weekend, this picture is from 2018 when the event was held in Chapelfield Gardens. Picture: Nick ButcherThe Nearly Festival Garden Party is one of the events you can attend this weekend, this picture is from 2018 when the event was held in Chapelfield Gardens. Picture: Nick Butcher

4. What: Nearly Festival Garden Party

Where: Wensum Valley Hotel Golf & Country Club, Beech Avenue, Taverham, NR8 6HP

When: September 12, 12pm to 8pm, September 13, 12pm to 7pm

Cost: Day tickets, over-14s £20, children (5 to 14) £7.50, under-5s free, weekend tickets sold out, gardenparties.musthavetickets.co.uk

This popular festival, which in previous years has come to parks across East Anglia, is back for 2020 and will present some of the UK’s finest tribute acts of legendary performers and groups such as Elton John, Oasis and on Sunday there is a Queen Live Aid tribute. There will also be food vendors and a bar and to adhere to social distancing, customers will need to book a four by three metre personal space for their group for two to six people.

Jamal Sealey (left) and Rahima Brandt (right), the organisers of the Norwich Free MarketJamal Sealey (left) and Rahima Brandt (right), the organisers of the Norwich Free Market

5. What: Norwich Free Market

Where: Back car park at Norwich Theatre Royal (outside Stage Two), Theatre Street, Norwich, NR2 1RL

When: September 13, 10am to 4pm

Cost: Free

A new monthly market where you’ll find live music, street food, coffee, clothes, bags, jewellery, ceramics and much more. There is no fees for stall holders or shoppers to enter and it is a thriving hub for community trade – you will be able to access it either by walking down Chantry Road or through the front entrance of the theatre.

The Summer Spectacular at Yarmouth's Hippodrome Circus, with social distancing measures in place Picture: David StreetThe Summer Spectacular at Yarmouth’s Hippodrome Circus, with social distancing measures in place Picture: David Street

6. What: Summer Spectacular

Where: Hippodrome Circus, St George’s Road, Great Yarmouth, NR30 2EU

When: Until September 20, various times

Cost: Adults £20 to £25, concessions (over 60s)/carers £17 to £22, children (0-14) £12 to £16 (babies on laps don’t need tickets), bookings must be made by phone 01493 738877 (box office opens from 10am daily), find full details at hippodromecircus.co.uk/summer-spectacular

The show must go on and Yarmouth’s Hippodrome Circus is making sure families don’t miss out this summer with Covid-safe performances, featuring amazing acrobats, aerialists, daring stunts, dancers, swimmers and its world famous Water Spectacular. The hosts are Jack Jay and Johnny Mac and there is a reduced capacity and running time, approximately 70 to 75 minutes, with no interval to prevent crowding – masks are also mandatory in the auditorium.

An assortment of Star Wing's bottled beers Picture: Star Wing BreweryAn assortment of Star Wing’s bottled beers Picture: Star Wing Brewery

7. What: Hops ‘n’ Hogs

Where: Star Wing Brewery, Unit 6, Hall Farm, Redgrave, IP22 1RJ

When: September 12, 12pm until 11pm

Cost: Free

Just across the border and a few miles from Diss, expect a fun day out for all the family, including four-legged guests, this weekend at Star Wing Brewery. There will be community hop picking, live music, food trucks and a free hog roast for the first 50 pickers.

Make sure to check online before heading to event as they made be cancelled or postponed at short notice due to coronavirus guidelines or weather conditions.


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Cyclist dies in crash on A134 at Northwold

The junction on the A134 at Northwold, where a 17-year-old cyclist died after a collision Picture: Chris Bishop

The junction on the A134 at Northwold, where a 17-year-old cyclist died after a collision Picture: Chris Bishop

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A man living next to a junction where a 17-year-old cyclist was killed has seen almost 100 crashes outside his home.

Adrian Jenkinson outside his home in Northwold, which stands beside a junction which has seen almost 100 crashes since he moved into the property in 1984 Picture: Chris BishopAdrian Jenkinson outside his home in Northwold, which stands beside a junction which has seen almost 100 crashes since he moved into the property in 1984 Picture: Chris Bishop

The teenager died on Thursday night after he was involved in a collision with a Mitsubishi pick-up truck on the A134 at Northwold.

Police say the driver left the scene of the crash, but a man in his 30s was later arrested in Attleborough, on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving.

Adrian Jenkinson, 60, has lived next to the scene of the collision, at the crossroads where the A134 meets Northwold Road and Methwold Road, since 1984.

He said in that time 98 accidents involving the emergency services have happened outside his home.

Adrian Jenkinson has kept a list of the 98 crashes whch have happened outside his home in Northwold, since he moved into the property in 1984 Picture: Chris BishopAdrian Jenkinson has kept a list of the 98 crashes whch have happened outside his home in Northwold, since he moved into the property in 1984 Picture: Chris Bishop

Design technology technician Mr Jenkinson, who has kept a list of the collisions, was first on the scene on Thursday night.

“We always go out,” he said. “You never know what you’re going out to.

“People blame the roads, they say they’re dangerous, but they’re only as dangerous as the drivers choose to make them.

“There’s been two fatalities since we’ve lived here. That’s two too many.”

Adrian Jenkinson has barricaded his home with reinforced steel girders, concrete and metal plating to prevent it being hit by vehicles Picture: Chris BishopAdrian Jenkinson has barricaded his home with reinforced steel girders, concrete and metal plating to prevent it being hit by vehicles Picture: Chris Bishop

So far, the house where Mr Jenkinson lives with his wife Janet has not been hit by a vehicle involved in an accident. But a car has ended up in his front garden.

Mr Jenkinson has barricaded the front of his property with reinforced steel joists, concrete and metal sheeting to protect it.

Emergency services attended the crash on Thursday but the cyclist was pronounced dead at the scene.

The Mitsubishi failed to stop. Police later attended an address in Attleborough where a man in his 30s was arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving.

The road was closed while emergency services dealt with the incident and scene investigations were carried out. It was reopened around 5am on Friday.

Officers are keen to hear from anyone who saw the collision, or has information concerning the driving manner the Mitsubishi or riding manner of the cyclist.

Anyone with information should contact the serious collision investigation unit at Wymondham on 101 or email SCIU@norfolk.pnn.police.uk


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RAF Honington personnel save Norfolk father who suffered heart attack at the wheel

Darren Ruck (centre) with his family at RAF Honington , whose personnel were first on scene after Mr Ruck suffered a heart attack at the wheel of his car in June. Picture: Cpl Dave Blackburn/RAF Honington/MOD

Darren Ruck (centre) with his family at RAF Honington , whose personnel were first on scene after Mr Ruck suffered a heart attack at the wheel of his car in June. Picture: Cpl Dave Blackburn/RAF Honington/MOD

© UK MOD Crown Copyright 2020. This image may be used for current news purposes only. It may not be used, reproduced or trans

Military personnel rushed to the aid of a dad who crashed after suffering a heart attack with his wife and young children in the car.

Darren Ruck (centre) with his family at RAF Honington , whose personnel were first on scene after Mr Ruck suffered a heart attack at the wheel of his car in June. Picture: Cpl Dave Blackburn/RAF Honington/MODDarren Ruck (centre) with his family at RAF Honington , whose personnel were first on scene after Mr Ruck suffered a heart attack at the wheel of his car in June. Picture: Cpl Dave Blackburn/RAF Honington/MOD

Darren Ruck, from Barningham, near Thetford, was driving near RAF Honington on Father’s Day, June 21, when he suddenly slumped at the wheel.

Assuming he was playing a practical joke, Mr Ruck’s wife, Marie, asked what he was doing, but the 40-year-old lorry driver did not respond.

When she noticed he was no longer holding the steering wheel, Mrs Ruck knew something was seriously wrong.

Desperate to regain control of the swerving vehicle, the horror-stricken mother grabbed hold of the wheel and steered the family’s truck for more than half a mile before eventually crashing into trees off Green Lane.

“Before the heart attack Darren was absolutely fine,” Mrs Ruck said. “He was chatting away and having a good bit of banter with his brother-in-law.

“After he lost consciousness I managed to keep the truck on the left side of the road, but then the panic hit me and there was a point when I just let go of the wheel.”

Mr Ruck was fortunate that trainee gunners from Honington, aircraftsmen Thomas Allan and Troy Taylor-Morgan, were passing on their way back to base, and they were quick to pull him out of the damaged truck.

The pair were closely followed by Corporal Ed Stanley, whose wife – a nurse – immediately began CPR. She was assisted by Corporals Alexander Bates and Sam Waugh.

This week Mr Ruck and family were reunited with the personnel at RAF Honington, where he thanked them for their life-saving efforts.

Having been taken to Papworth Hospital, Mr Ruck suffered a second heart attack the following morning. He was then moved between Papworth and Addenbrooke’s Hospital, which are both in Cambridge, to have stents and a defibrillator fitted, before finally heading home three weeks after the collision.

“I remember nothing about that day,” said Mr Ruck. “There are a couple of bits from the days before, but that’s it. The first thing I remember is waking up in hospital and wondering what was happening.”

Mrs Ruck added: “I couldn’t visit him in hospital because of Covid, so I was just waiting by the phone.

“Now he’s home we keep saying how lucky we are that this didn’t happen when he was on his own.”


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OPINION: We'd have run out of food for 2020 by now if we didn't use imported goods

Opinion

The UK imports around 400,000 tonnes of fresh tomatoes each year from countries such as The Netherlands

The UK imports around 400,000 tonnes of fresh tomatoes each year from countries such as The Netherlands

dgdimension

Columnist Andy Newman says we need to swallow our pride if we think we can just rely on food produced in the UK

It is now nearly six months since those dark days at the start of the Covid crisis, when many people had very real concerns about how they were going to feed their families during lockdown. We genuinely didn’t know if our food production and distribution system was going to be able to cope.

We rightly stood and clapped NHS workers, but that those toiling away to keep us fed also deserve our gratitude. Whatever other parts of the UK’s infrastructure struggled, there was always food on the shelves, and in the thousands of vans delivering it to our door. Our farmers, producers, distributors and retailers all stepped up to the plate when needed.

But last Friday we were reminded that we are very far from being self-sufficient as a nation when it comes to feeding ourselves. August 21 was the date that, if we were relying solely on food produced in the UK, we would have run out. Without imports, we would have nothing to eat for the rest of the year.

You see, the fact that we continued to have food on the table throughout lockdown is not just a British achievement.

Even as we in the UK looked on in horror at the toll the pandemic was taking in Italy, truck drivers from that country were driving to Norwich every day with lorries loaded with all sorts of produce. When they got to the Norfolk distribution centres they weren’t even allowed to get out of their vehicles; they sat there while unloading took place, and then drove straight back to the continent. And because of them, and many like them, the shelves remained stocked.

I mention this because there is a significant under-current of British exceptionalism around, which needs to be debunked. The sense that we don’t need the rest of the world, or at any rate ‘they need us more than we need them’ is simply nonsense. Whatever political and regulatory structures we end up with, we are inter-dependent, not just for the luxuries, but in order to survive.

Of course, we could be doing more to try and achieve a higher level of food self-sufficiency, but even at its peak 40 years ago we only managed to get to 75 per cent – which means even then we were reliant on imports for a quarter of everything we ate.

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Let’s not forget also that increasing food production means we would have to farm more intensively, and work our limited land supply even harder. How does that square with the commitment to respect the environment and be better guardians of the countryside?

The Covid crisis may have shone the spotlight on our food security, but the truth is that in good times and bad, we need to have a free-flowing trading relationship with other countries if we are not to go hungry. Pretending that this is not true, invoking some strange and very rose-tinted wartime spirit and hoping everything will be alright just doesn’t cut it.

If so-called independence means we have to starve, that is not a price worth paying.

There is actually nothing wrong in being dependent on imports for a proportion of what we eat. It’s a function of the inter-connected world in which we live, and it’s a fact of life that almost every nation on earth needs imports, whether of food, energy or other vital commodities.

It is for this reason that the most prosperous countries are those which embrace open trade, and the least successful tend to be those which adopt a protectionist approach in the misguided hope that this will somehow boost domestic production and increase self-sufficiency. Experience teaches us that this simply doesn’t happen.

Here in Norfolk we produce about a tenth of the nation’s food, which makes us a net exporter as a county; in other areas (such as energy) we are a net importer. All that means is that we are playing to our strengths, and the fact that when you turn on your TV the power to run it is coming from a Suffolk nuclear power plant or a gas-fired power station in Yorkshire is neither here nor there.

If we are happy that this happens between regions in the UK, why do some people have a problem accepting it can happen between different countries as well? As the lockdown showed, even in the most adverse situations the system doesn’t break down. It has served us well for decades.

The thing which threatens our food supply is not the coronavirus, it is isolating ourselves and convincing ourselves we don’t need the rest of the world.

That is sheer stupidity – and there is no vaccine for that.


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